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Every living being has two faces; an external face and an internal one. The external face shows our faces and their wrinkles, our hair, or our baldness. But there's another type of face that we simply can't escape. This internal face is impossible to trick. It is the face that reveals our Divine soul with all of its vulnerabilities and strengths.

Rabbi Allouche

Panim” is the Hebrew word for “face” in Hebrew.

But Hebrew-language experts will be quick to point out that “panim” is really the Hebrew word for “faces,” in the plural tense. Astonishingly, the Hebrew language does not have a word for one, singular face!

The reason is telling: There is no word for just one face in Hebrew, because the idea that people have just one face, is simply false.

Every living being has two faces; an external face and an internal one. The external face shows our faces and their wrinkles, our hair, or our baldness. But this face can easily be tricked. Some band-aids, a little make-up, a smile, and, abracadabra!, all looks perfect and shining.

Most of us wish this external face were the only one. But there’s another type of face that we simply can’t escape. This internal face is impossible to trick. It is the face that reveals our Divine soul with all of its vulnerabilities and strengths. 

I’m sure you’ve encountered this internal face before. It communicates the language of our Divine soul and it begs to be treated – and nurtured – at least as much as our external face is treated. (This is why, when our soul feels abandoned, it sends signals and launches moods of depression, sadness, etc.) So why not give it the love it deserves?

Our Sages teach us that when the Red Sea split for the People of Israel upon their exodus from Egypt – as we read about in this week’s portion – all the waters of the world also split. This includes the waters of the Mississippi River, the waters of the waterfalls in Sedona here in Arizona, the waters of our baths, Jacuzzis and hot-tubs, and the waters in our coffee and tea cups. The deep, deep sea of our beings also split in two, and for a brief moment, its internal face, the face of our burning soul, and all of its content was exposed to the light of day.

During these last days of Passover (which begin tonight, until Sunday evening [Yizkor will also take place on Sunday morning}), in which we celebrate the “splitting of the sea”, it is time we split our own sea too, and unleash our deepest face, our Divine soul, by dedicating ourselves to that which it desires most: G-d, His Torah, and His Mitzvot. 

Our two faces will then synchronize in perfect harmony, and brighten our lives, and our world.